IA Tips…How to explain your CONTROLLED VARIABLES

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Explaining the “controlled variables” is tricky. Most students state or maybe describe, but few really explain them. Here’s how to do it and an example to show you. What are controlled variables? A “controlled variable” is any factor that could affect your results so you kept it constant in both conditions of your experiment. You want to control certain variables …

How to use APA referencing for your IA and EE

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This post is designed to give you a quick guide on how to make sure you’re using APA formatting properly. It will cover the two main elements to consider when using APA-style referencing in your psychology papers: in-text citations and the references list. When it comes to citations, I think the why is just as important as the how. So I am intent …

IA Tips…How to explain your PARTICIPANTS

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You must “explain” the five elements of the exploration: Design, Sampling technique, Controls, Materials, Participants to get full marks for the IA exploration (4 marks). In this post we’ll look at how to explain your choice of participants.  Explaining participant choices is quite difficult. I would aim to have one really excellent explanation that clearly shows how you are controlling …

IA Tips: How to explain your…MATERIALS

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The key to a great IA is attention to detail. The Exploration is worth the fewest marks (4) but probably requires the most attention. I don’t think the Exploration is a difficult section to write, as long as you follow some basic guidelines.  I’ve already made a video explaining how to use the What-How-Why method (State-Describe-Explain) to explain each section …

IA tips for Glanzer and Cunitz Studies

Travis Dixon Internal Assessment (IB) 2 Comments

It’s a popular study to replicate for the IA, but Glanzer and Cunitz’s 1966 study on the serial position effect is filled with danger when you’re not careful. If you’re doing this study for your IA, read this post carefully! Read more: Key Study: Multi-store Model and The Primacy and Recency Effects Key Studies for the IA These famous psychologists …

How to avoid the biggest mistake in IAs
Linking your experiment to the theory

Travis Dixon Internal Assessment (IB) 3 Comments

The most common mistake I’ve seen in IAs with the new curriculum is the lack of focus on the background theory or model. Students spend all their time and energy on the original study they’re replicating, that they completely overlook this crucial element. In this blog post (and video), (and in the video below) I want to show you an easy …

Over 2200 words? 5 tips to help

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It’s a great problem to have, but it’s still a problem. Hard-working students lament over having to cut out aspects of their IA to get under the 2200 words. But there’s always the fear that you’ll lose something important and that will cost you marks. Here’s 5 ways you can reduce your word count without losing marks.  Firstly, remember that …

These famous psychologists would fail their IAs!

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I can barely get through a psychology TED™ Talk by a psychologist these days without sighing at the blatant manipulation being presented. In class, I can’t help but pause the video and comment. My students know what’s coming and I’m sure I annoy the heck out of them. But I think it’s important. Here’s why these psychologists would fail their …

Key Studies for the IA
A list of good studies to replicate for the IB Psychology Internal Assessment.

Travis Dixon Internal Assessment (IB) 24 Comments

Remember that actually in the new IB Psych curriculum (first exams May 2019) the theory is actually more important than the study. In fact, you could even conduct the IA successfully without replicating a study but by designing your own experiment that tests a theory. However, it is strongly advised that you replicate an original study, simplify it (if necessary) to two conditions and …