The MAOA (“Warrior”) Gene and Violence

tdixon Biological Psychology, Criminology Leave a Comment

In IB Psychology you need to be able to explain at least one example of how behaviour could be influenced by genetic factors. In this post, we’ll look at why a variation of the MAOA gene (a.k.a the “warrior gene”) could be linked with antisocial behaviours like aggression. There are two explanations: a simple one and a complex one. We’ll …

Lesson Idea: Neuroplasticity

tdixon Biological Psychology, Criminology 1 Comment

This activity is designed to accompany the Criminology lesson 2.7b: Childhood and Brain Development. A good way to learn about neuroplasticity is to compare your performance on something you’re a master at, with something with which you’re a novice. Find someone in your class with whom you can share talents – they’ll try to teach you something you’ve never tried …

How does testosterone influence aggression?

tdixon Biological Psychology, Criminology, Revision and Exam Preparation Leave a Comment

Understanding how testosterone can influence aggression can be a little tricky, so this post is designed to provide extra help. This post is designed to support the materials in Topic 2.4 of our textbook, IB Psychology: A Student’s Guide. Common Errors Here is what an over-simplified (and incorrect) explanation for testosterone and aggression might look like: So in writing, this …

Criminology Support Pack: Now Available

tdixon Criminology, Curriculum, Teaching Ideas, Themantics Leave a Comment

BUY YOURSELF SOME TIME WITH OUR TEACHER SUPPORT PACK. You can get your full teacher support pack HERE! This pack for Criminology contains: Complete unit plan with learning outcomes, key terms and lesson overviews 9 x topic plans with learning outcomes 25 x individual lesson plans following our C.H.A.C.E.R framework 10 x individual activity handouts Links to complete online resources …

PowerPoint: Criminology (Preview)

tdixon Criminology, Teaching Ideas Leave a Comment

Click here to purchase ThemEd’s teacher support pack for Criminology. This Powerpoint is designed to accompany the Criminology (Chapter 2) unit plan and the student workbook. I added some comments to the slides as well to hopefully make it easier to see how to use them. For those teachers using IB Psychology: A Student’s Guide, you will hopefully see how …

Unit Plan: Criminology (Preview)

tdixon Criminology, Curriculum, Teaching Ideas, Themantics 2 Comments

Click here to purchase ThemEd’s teacher support pack for Criminology. This is a preview of the full unit plan for Criminology (coming soon). The lesson-by-lesson plan follows our CHACER model. This is the first time I’ve ever had a unit planned out in its entirety from the very first lesson. In the past I’ve always had skeletons of unit, topic …

Student Workbook: Criminology (Preview)

tdixon Criminology 5 Comments

Click here to purchase ThemEd’s teacher support pack for Criminology. After the popularity and success of the Introduction Workbook in my own classes and due to high demand from teachers around the world using our new textbook, we’ve decided to release some materials for the next chapter: Criminology. What I like about hard copy workbooks for students is that all …

Key Studies: The effects of mindfulness and meditation on the brain (Desbordes et al. 2012, and Lazar et al. 2005)

tdixon Biological Psychology, Criminology, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Leave a Comment

These two studies can be used to discuss: The use of technological techniques Neuroplasticity Experimental methods (quasi and true experiments) to study: The brain cognitive processes Lazar et al. (2005)   There have been numerous studies that have compared the brains of Tibetan monks who have thousands of hours of practice in meditation with normal controls. These studies regularly show …

Key Study: Testosterone and aggression in rats (Albert et al. 1986)

tdixon Biological Psychology, Criminology 2 Comments

The material here was originally published in IB Psychology: A Student’s Guide. Males are more aggressive than females in almost every species. Why is this? One possible reason could be in the influence of the male sex hormone, testosterone. Testosterone is produced in the testes of males, which could be why males are more aggressive than females. While it is also …